Social Studies Course Descriptions

WORLD HISTORY II
In this ninth grade course, students study the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. Additionally students study the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and South America. Students will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world.

WORLD HISTORY II 10                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #201
This is an accelerated honors course. Textbook and outside reading will be assigned at an accelerated pace. Extensive oral and written work will be required. Course load is demanding.
Prerequisite: A grade of A- or better in World History I in grade 8 or approval of the department chair.

WORLD HISTORY II 11                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #203
This is a college preparatory survey course. Textbook and supplementary readings are assigned. A variety of written work and projects are expected.
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in grade 8 history and recommendation of teacher.

U.S. HISTORY I: The Revolution through Reconstruction
In this grade ten class, students will examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States during the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. Students will learn about the factors in and consequences of the Revolution, the writing and key ideas of the U.S. Constitution, the framework of American democracy and government, westward expansion, sectionalism and the consequences of the Civil War including Reconstruction. The reading and analysis of primary source documents is an integral part of this course.

U.S. HISTORY I 20                                2.50 Credits/Semester Course #211
This is an accelerated honors course. Textbook and outside reading will be assigned at an accelerated pace. Extensive oral and written work will be required. Course load is demanding.
Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in World History II 10 or an A- in World History II 11, teacher recommendation, and/or approval of the department chair.

U.S. HISTORY I 21                                2.50 Credits/Semester Course #213
This course progresses at a more accelerated pace than U.S. History I 22. Textbook and supplementary readings are assigned. A variety of written work and projects are expected.
Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in World History II 11 or approval of the department chair.

U.S. HISTORY I 22                                2.50 Credits/Semester Course #215
This course typically has a lower student to teacher ratio than U.S. History I 21. Textbook and supplementary readings are assigned. A variety of written work and projects are expected.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of World History II.

AP U.S. HISTORY II 30                            2.5 Credits/Semester Course #217
The AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with analytical skills and the factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the issues of United States History. This program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. This AP United States History course will train students to analyze and interpret primary sources, including documentary material. Students should learn to take notes from printed materials, lectures and discussions. This course prepares students for the May Advanced Placement exam and possible college credit.
Prerequisite: A grade of A- or better in World History II 20, or an A in World History II 21, teacher recommendation, and/or the approval of the department chair.

U.S. HISTORY II: Reconstruction to the Present
In this grade eleven class, students will analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution and America's growing role in diplomatic relations. Students will study the goals and accomplishments of the Progressive movement and the New Deal. Students will also learn about the various factors that led to America’s entry into World War II as well as the consequences of World War II on American life. Finally, students will study the causes and course of the Cold War, important economic and political changes during the Cold War, including the Civil Rights movement, and recent events and trends that have shaped modern-day America. The study and analysis of primary sources documents is an integral part of coursework.

U.S. HISTORY II 30                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #219
This is an accelerated honors course. Textbook and outside reading will be assigned at an accelerated pace. Extensive oral and written work will be required. Course load is demanding.
Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in U.S. History I 20 or an A- in U.S. History I 21, teacher recommendation and/or approval of the department chair.

U.S. HISTORY II 31                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #221
This course progresses at a more accelerated pace than U.S. History II 32. Textbook and supplementary readings are assigned. A variety of written work and projects are expected.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I.

U.S. HISTORY II 32                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #223
This course typically has a lower student to teacher ratio than U.S. History II 31. Textbook and supplementary readings are assigned. A variety of written work and projects are expected.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of U.S. History I.

AP PSYCHOLOGY 40                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #231
AP Psychology will be the equivalent of a college introduction course. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the AP Psychology exam. They may be eligible to receive college credits and exemption from taking the course in college. The units to be studied include scientific method, biological basis of behavior, learning, development, personality, abnormal psychology, mental health, and social psychology. Classroom learning methods will include theory analysis, experimentation, extensive research-based assignments, lecture/discussion, and testing.
Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in US History II 30/31, a recommendation from teacher and/or approval of the department chair. This course will only be offered to the senior class.

PSYCHOLOGY 41, 42                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #233, 234, 251, 252
Psychology is a heterogeneous course which will help students gain a deeper understanding of personality and behavior as well as relationships with others. Through a variety of articles, films, experiments, and class discussion, students will learn more about themselves and others. Some of the topics to be studied and discussed are scientific method, famous psychologists, child development theories, learning techniques, personalities, mental health issues, intelligence, emotions, adolescence, identity, and dreams. An objective of this course is to have all students develop a more positive self-concept.
Prerequisite: Completion of U.S. History II. This semester course will only be offered to the senior class.

SOCIOLOGY 41, 40, 42                            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #235, 236, 243, 244, 247, 248
This heterogeneous course is designed to make students more aware of the various roles that individuals play in society. This course will investigate such important contemporary issues as family roles, gender stereotyping, racism in America and the world, crime and the criminal justice system, the educational system, and recent social movements. Each topic will be researched and discussed in an open forum.
Prerequisite: Completion of U.S. History II. This semester course will only be offered to the senior class.

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 40 2.50 Credits/Semester Course #238
This course is designed to teach American constitutional government based on the principles of our government, interpretation of original documents, political beliefs and behavior, political parties and interest groups, national institutions and policy processes, and law. By the end of second semester, students who complete the assigned readings and projects, participate actively in class discussions, and score well on the instructor’s tests, should be fully prepared for success on the AP Government and Politics examination. This course is open to all students in grades 11 and 12.

*AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY I 21                    2.50 Credits/Semester Course #275a        

(offered in alternate years with Issues – 60’s to 90’s)
This heterogeneous multi-grade level class will examine African American History from the beginning of Slavery through Reconstruction. It will cover major events of this period: Development of Slavery, Atlantic Passage, Slave Life, Slave Rebellion, Abolitionist Movement, Civil War and Reconstruction. The course will include a variety of active learning activities such as lecture, debate, and group presentation. Selected reading and research projects will be required. This will be a one-semester class. Students can choose to take the second part as well.

*AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY II 21                2.50 Credits/Semester Course #276b       

(offered in alternate years with Issues – 60’s to 90’s)
This heterogeneous multi-grade level class will examine modern African American History after Reconstruction. It will cover major events of this period: Development of Segregation and Jim Crow, Suffrage, The Great Wars, Civil Rights Era, and Current Issues. The course will include a variety of active learning activities such as lecture, debate, and group presentation. Selected reading and research projects will be required. This will be a one-semester class. African American History I is not a prerequisite for this class.

*ISSUES – 60’S TO 90’S 21                            2.5 Credits/Semester Course #269, 270   

(offered in alternate years with African American History)?This heterogeneous, multi- grade level class will examine Contemporary American History and society through an examination of several major events- Cold War Era, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam Era, Youth Culture, and Women’s Movement—students will have the opportunity to read, discuss and write on selected topics. The course will include a variety of learning activities such as lecture, debate and group presentation. Selected readings and research projects will be required.

INTRODUCTION TO LAW I 21                        2.50 Credits/Semester Course #265
Introduction to Law is a one semester course which exposes students to all facets of the American legal system. Students focus on procedural law, paying particular attention to the balance between the government’s duty to protect society versus individual rights as guaranteed by the United States Bill of Rights. The course begins with a brief study of the sources of American law: common, constitutional, legislative, and administrative law. It continues with a study of the creation and enforcement of laws as well as both the federal and state level judicial systems. Class discussion, through which students will analyze actual and hypothetical cases, is an integral component of this course.

LAW II 21                                    2.50 Credits/Semester Course #268
This course will continue with Civil Law including topics such as Contracts, Warranties, Consumer Issues, and Family Law. Aspects of Criminal Law not covered in Law I will be explored such as Juvenile Justice and Law and Terrorism. In addition, as students taking Introduction to Law will already have a background in Law from part I, Moot Courts, Mock Trials, and other role-playing opportunities will be explored to enhance the study of Law.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Law I. Open to grades 10-12.

CURRENT ISSUES AND WORLD AFFAIRS 31            2.50 Credits/Semester Course #271a, 271b
Current Issues and World Affairs is a one semester elective course in which we study current events and contemporary themes around the globe. The course will focus on the major themes of the contemporary world including the technology, environment, economics, Middle East and Terrorism, diplomacy, and others that become prominent as the semester progresses. We will discuss these events and themes in their context but also discuss their significance to specific historical events and periods as well as analyzing their impact on our future. This class will provide varied activities to enhance our skills as thinkers, writers, readers and historians. Students will be expected to keep abreast of current events and topics through consistent reading of print and electronic media.

MODERN MILITARY HISTORY 31                    2.50 Credits/Semester Course #273a, 273b
This course is an investigation of military history over the past 70 years. The course of study will include: World War II, Korean War, Wars of decolonization & independence, Vietnam War, Cold War, Middle East conflicts, and America in Iraq & Afghanistan. We will begin the semester by studying Sun Tzu’s The Art of War. We will discuss these events in their context, as well as their significance to the present day and their relationship to the writings of Sun Tzu. The students are challenged with at home readings and watching film. The students are taught the what, why, and how of modern wars.
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